Root Veggie Abundance

20160910_113257 It’s that time of year when we’re digging up all our root veggies and trying to figure out what to do with this much!  Root vegetables do store well for quite a long time, and especially if you have a basement with a cold storage space you can keep a large harvest for several months.  http://modernfarmer.com/2015/08/how-to-store-root-crops-for-winter/  However, many of us in Canmore live in tiny condos and apartments without basements, yards, or much storage of any kind.  So when we have more than what fits in our fridge we tend to share, which is awesome.  In fact, the veggies in these photos came from my neighbour’s Mom’s garden – YUMM!  With a little planning, and a day set aside for food prep, you can be eating your veggies well into winter, and reduce food waste.

If you have a deep freeze, you can roast your root vegetables and freeze them for quick meals later on.  I don’t advise using potatoes, they don’t tend to freeze as well, but turnips, parsnips, carrots and beets work really well.

Wash, trim and peel as needed.  Chop into 1 inch or smaller pieces.  Put in a casserole 20160910_115118dish, toss with a bit of olive oil and roast, covered, between 350-400 degrees, checking once in a while.  You can give it a stir  if you wish.  They are done when they are nicely carmelized and a bit soft.  You can also roast your veggies on the barbeque in a thick metal pan.  Careful the bottom doesn’t scorch.  Freeze in 2 to 3 cup portions for later use in soups, stews, lasagna, casseroles, vegetable pies, moussaka, and anything else you can think of!

Quick And Hearty 10 Minute Soup:  in a large saucepan, saute an onion or a couple of shallots until carmelized along with your favorite herb – I like sage – add 2 cups roasted root vegetables and stir a few times, add 3 cups broth, salt and pepper to taste, bring to a boil then puree your soup.  Add more broth or water if needed.

Use your favorite carrot cake or muffin recipe to make Root Veggie cake or muffins. Any crunchy sweet root vegetable, whatever you have, can work.  This will freeze well.  http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/carrot-cake-with-cream-cheese-frosting-51191810

Beet Pate freezes well too.  Freeze it in 1 to 1-1/2 cup portions to thaw for a quick treat or potluck dish.  Try using turnips or parsnips or a mixture of veggies.  https://www.washingtonpost.com/pb/recipes/beet-walnut-pate/13150/

Canning:  beets and carrots are especially popular pickled or canned. http://www.healthycanning.com/canning-vegetables/ http://allrecipes.com/recipe/38109/pickled-beets/  http://www.pickyourown.org/beets_canning.htm

Drying:  Dehydrating will give your harvest a long shelf life in your cupboard.  Try making your own Root Vegetable Chips as a snack or for garnishing salads and soups. https://www.leaf.tv/articles/how-to-make-crisp-dehydrated-vegetable-chips/  http://www.wellpreserved.ca/air-dried-dehydrated-root-vegetables-inspired-by-faviken/

What are your favorite ways to store your root vegetable harvest?

Insect Hotels by Donna Vultier

13151944_1243086919035102_3007313947948890077_nThe vanishing population of bees and other beneficial insects is a threat to gardens and to ecological balance in general. Attracting insects to our garden that are useful for pollination and the reduction of destructive pests provides a chance to sync with nature. An insect hotel is a man made structure built from natural materials and intended to attract and provide shelter for beneficial insects. These hotels are intended as nest sites and some to allow for hibernation. They also add an aesthetic quality to any landscape.

The first ‘hotel’ to be built in the Canmore Community Garden was a 2014 project using13133115_1243086945701766_437115875313292944_n clay tiles and a variety of natural materials readily available. It was located under one of the cisterns to provide protection from harsh elements like driving rain and intense sun. There is evidence that the ‘hotel’ has been occupied; you will see that some of the holes that were drilled in wood blocks are sealed. This is likely solitary bees who have laid their eggs and then sealed the hole to protect them. The second ‘hotel’ project began in 2015 and is ongoing. Used pallets already in the garden were the foundation and various materials are being added as time goes by. There is talk of a green roof being added for protection from rain and to provide habitat for wild flowers and grasses that the insects are drawn to.

Community gardeners are invited to add to and help maintain the insect hotels. Wood, rock, tile, reeds, bamboo, rotting wood, bark, terra cotta shards, brick, twigs, straw, grasses, leaves and logs or wood blocks with holes drilled into them – a variety of materials will attract a variety of beneficial insects. Use recycled, untreated natural materials and don’t forget to decorate – options are limitless.

10505290_853698431307288_6989373649008740504_n

Compost Project at CCG by Anne Wilson

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We’ll be making a hot compost pile, so please put the green stuff, including all weeds, in one stock pile,(the big messy pile in the garden).

We’ll layer the green stuff with the brown stuff, and some fresh manure, water it, trample the layers down to squeeze out air and get the manure in contact with the green material, and let it cook for a month. Then we’ll turn it and use it to make a bed. The last year’s pile has potatoes in it now.

 We made the hospital garden with passive composting. This is hot composting to cook the weeds. They’re too hard to separate from the other green stuff.

Diseased plant parts can go to the bush outside the garden, or in the garbage.

FAQs:

Q: Won’t trampling out the air make the pile too compact?

A: No, there’s a lot of air in green plant material.

Q: Won’t the weed seeds survive and germinate?

A: If the pile gets hot enough the weed seeds will get “cooked”.

Q: Why fresh manure, why not well-rotted manure?

A: Fresh manure will compost at a high temperature, and will make the green material hot too. Usually we like well-rotted manure to top-dress a bed, and fresh manure would “burn” the plants, not good.

Q: Where will the manure come from?

A: Hopefully the horse stables by the Alpine Club, but maybe from the horse stables in Banff.

We should be building the pile in the next couple weeks, on one of the Sunday (noon to 5) or Tuesday(3-8) gardening-together sessions. Ask me anything!

Anne, for the Potato and Compost tea

Join Our Board!

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It’s 2016. We have signed the lease, built our community garden with its wildlife-proof fence, a greenhouse and a shed, and the Canmore Community Gardening Society has entered its “maintenance phase”.  We have completed our big tasks. Now we need to keep things rolling along to ensure we continue to have access to our community garden.  Even though we have no more major projects in our near future, we still need Garden Members to join the Board and keep things functioning smoothly.  Ideally we should have at least ten Members on our Board.  We currently have five.  That means we would love to add at least five new Board Members this spring, both Communal and Plot gardeners.  Your contribution is vital to keeping the Canmore Community Gardening Society a vibrant, healthy organization, and to keeping our community garden open and operating.

What do Board Members do?  The quick answer is we meet regularly to make decisions about the Society and its projects, the main project being the community garden.  The longer answer is we endeavour to provide good governance and leadership for the organization.  We are also a managing board so we identify and follow through on all issues that come up as well as organizing events, meetings, and registration.  This is not to say that Board Members do everything themselves.  Ideally, the Board will identify items that need to happen and then delegate many of these tasks to volunteers. Management items the Board works on and oversees on include:

  • Registration of new Members and registration of the Season’s Community Gardeners, collecting payment
  • Taking inventory and ordering supplies, Communal Garden seeds, compost…
  • Ensuring communication between the Plot Gardeners and the Garden Co-ordinator and Board
  • Ensuring communication between Communal Garden teams, and between the teams and the Garden Co-ordinator and Board
  • Co-ordinating volunteers and work teams, ensuring jobs get done
  • Organizing the Opening and closing Work Parties, and the Annual General Meeting
  • Troubleshooting disease and pests
  • Monitoring the Garden to ensure that policies are followed.
  • Identifying projects that are in keeping with CCGS goals of promoting community and gardening knowledge, like workshops, off-season events(guest speakers, movie nights)
  • Fundraising
  • Applying for grants
  • Hiring, training and supervising summer employees
  • Maintenance of website, blog, Facebook page

The Executive

The Board includes Members-At-Large and three executive positions:

  • President: The President is responsible for preparing the agendas and chairing both the Board meetings and the Annual General Meeting.  She/He also writes the President’s Report to present at the AGM. That is the President’s official job.  The President also usually provides leadership to the organization and liaises with the community, government and other organizations as needed.  The position of President is vacant and hopefully will be filled at the AGM.
  • Secretary: The Secretary is responsible to take the minutes at the meetings, keep the CCGS’s official minutes and documents, maintain Membership records and oversee registration.  The position of Secretary is currently filled.
  • Treasurer: The Treasurer is responsible for keeping track of and reporting to the Board on the CCGS’s finances, compiles the budget, arranges for the audit and presents the Treasurer’s Report at the AGM.  Because we do not have a budget for staff, the Treasurer also looks after the bookkeeping, banking and payroll, and filing the corporate Annual Return.  The position of Treasurer is currently filled.

Benefits of being on The Board:

  • Get to know like-minded people in your community by working with them.
  • Have a say in how things are done and the satisfaction of keeping your community garden running well.
  • Ensure the projects and programs you would like to see in the community garden happen.
  • Gain experience. CCGS sends Board Members to Board development seminars and workshops when available.

If you are interested in finding out more about joining the Canmore Community Gardening Board, you are invited to attend the next Board meeting (our last one before the AGM) on Wednesday March 16, 2016 at 7pm.  Please email us if you have any questions.

Voles by Donna Vultier

As you may know, the crops in the Canmore community garden have been experiencing some damage this season due to voles. This is not unique to the community garden as these ‘pests’ are all over Canmore this summer in many yards and gardens. A bit of reading portrays them as anything from key elements in a balanced eco system to destructive pests that can do extensive damage to trees, shrubs, lawns and gardens.

Voles are small rodents similar to mice. There are many species of voles but it is most likely we have Southern Red-Backed voles in the community garden.

According to an article from Colorado State University “voles are active day and night throughout the year and do not hibernate. They usually live between two and six months. Their home ranges usually are less than one-fourth acre and vary with season, food supply and population density. Voles construct many surface runways and underground tunnels with numerous burrow entrances. A single burrow may contain several adults and young.

Population densities of voles vary from species to species. Large population fluctuations that range from 14 to 500 voles per acre are common. Their numbers generally peak every three to five years. Population is influenced by dispersal, food quality, climate, predation, physiological stress, and genetics.

Voles have three to six young per litter and three to 12 litters per year. Their gestation period ranges from 20 to 23 days and they breed almost year around, although most reproduction occurs in spring, summer and fall. Females may become pregnant at three weeks of age.

Voles can cause extensive damage to forests, orchards and ornamental plants by girdling trees and shrubs. The greatest damage seems to coincide with years of heavy snowfall.

Damage to crops, such as alfalfa, clover, potatoes, carrots, beets and turnips is common and most evident when voles are at high population levels. Voles often damage lawns and golf courses by constructing runways and burrow systems.”

Voles do have natural predators, for example hawks, coyotes and in urban areas, cats. Other methods to prevent and control damage are numerous: habitat management, exclusion, repellents, trapping, and poison grain baits. In general repellents are not considered very effective in the case of voles. Exclusion would involve installing specialized fencing which would be challenging and expensive in a space as large as the community garden. Poison bates have been ruled out by CCGS as not appropriate in the case of a community garden. Traps are currently being experimented with but going forward habitat management will be best defense, so elimination of weed ground cover and tall grasses by frequent and close mowing and keeping the garden tidy will eliminate some of the available habitat and will reduce their numbers. It is also recommended not to use mulch or straw which also provides the cover voles seek out.

Call for Communal Garden Committee Members

ATTENTION COMMUNAL GARDENERS!!!  If you would like to get involved in the management of the Communal Garden, we are currently looking for Members to sit on the Communal Garden Committee.  If you are interested or would like more information please send us an email.

CCGS Communal Garden Committee

List of Responsibilities and Tasks

Reports to: Board

# of Members:  unlimited.  Encourage a Member from each Communal Garden Team and one Board Member.  Any Communal Gardener who is interested in getting involved may join.

Timeline:  Year-round – 3 to 5 meetings

Job:  Manage Communal Garden concerns including –

  • Plan Teams, assign garden beds and crops
  • Work with Registration to assign Members to Teams
  • Plan and purchase seed and supplies within set budget
  • Co-ordinate seed starting, start purchases
  • Research and advise Board regarding Communal Garden Budget and advise on options to raise additional funds if needed
  • Manage seed stock throughout season
  • Establish effective communication system among Communal Garden Members
  • Liaise with Board and Garden Ambassador
  • Manage seed collect saving

Why Start Your Own Seed?

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Many of our gardeners might be wondering why we had our AGM and opened up registration for the season in February already this year.  Here is your answer:  It’s time to start planning your garden in earnest!  Why?  Because it’s time to order and start seed for some of the veggies you are going to want to grow this summer, and when possible it is best to start your own seed.

It is less expensive, you have access to a much larger selection of varieties which means not only can you pick and choose interesting varities but you can pick and choose specifically for our Bow Valley needs, and most importantly you know where your little plants have been and that they haven’t been exposed to chemicals you don’t want to introduce into your garden, and especially our community garden.  So yes, you have to find some space for a tray, which might be tricky if you live in a tiny little apartment, but get creative!  Clear off a shelf on your bookcase, or an end table, or the top of your dresser like I did.  You will need to invest in some lights, but that doesn’t have to be complicated.  Lee Valley and several other seed companies have light setups you can order specifically for seed starting if you want to make an investment.  On the other hand, I bought fluorescent bulbs (the expensive ones that are sold specifically for plants are great but regular fluorescents will work too) and popped them into utility clip fixtures that I already had.  I have my lights plugged into a timer but you can just as easily turn them on when you get up in the morning and off when you go to bed.  As for trays, Sunnyside sells the black plastic seed starting trays for $2.50; you don’t need the lid.  They are great because they have the channels that distribute water throughout for bottom watering but you can also use any waterproof plastic or Styrofoam trays you have lying around.  As for pots, make them out of newspaper.  It is free and abundantly available, it breathes, it wicks up water very efficiently and you pop the whole thing into the ground when it is time to plant so you have minimal root disturbance.  Here is an excellent blog on seed starting:

http://evonnesmulders.com/2013/03/05/a-primer-on-seed-starting/

I want to talk about why it’s important to know where your little starts have been.  Recently we have become painfully aware of the damage the insecticide family neonicotinoids have been causing in the environment and how widespread their use is.  It is a systemic pesticide that gets into all the cells of the plant, and into the soil around the plant as well and it takes years to clear out of your garden, and while it may do a good job killing pests, it does not discriminate between good and bad insects.  It is deadly to our bees and other pollinators.  So obviously we want to avoid this chemical.  The problem is unless you are buying certified organic plants, or plants that were grown by the seller who can tell you where it’s been and what they used on it, there is no way to know for sure if your plants have been treated with neonics or not.  This goes for veggie starts as well as annuals and landscaping plants.  I emailed Sunnyside last summer to ask if their plants had been treated with neonicotinoids, and here is the reply I received:

“Hi Nicole,

I can not positively say if all the plants we receive have been treated with chemicals as they come from various suppliers. We do know that some suppliers do use biologicals for pest management instead.

To be on the safe side assume yes.

Have a great day”

I’m not saying that all plants sold at nurseries are treated with this stuff, just that it is hard to know for sure so best to just buy your own untreated seed and start your own plants.

Here is a neat tool to help you plan:  http://www.johnnyseeds.com/e-pdgseedstart.aspx

The following nurseries start their own plants from seed and do not use neonicotinoids:

Wild About Flowers www.wildaboutflowers.ca 

Bow Point Nursery http://www.bowpointnursery.com/

Vale’s Greenhouse http://www.valesgreenhouse.com/

Winderberry Nursery http://winderberry.ca/

Mountain Lady’s Greenhouse here in town does carry organic veggie and herb starts, just make sure to double-check what you are getting before you buy it.  And while you’re there, let them know you want to buy plants that are guaranteed to have not been treated with neonicotinoids.

For more information on neonics:  http://www.davidsuzuki.org/blogs/science-matters/2014/07/its-time-to-save-the-bees-and-ban-neonic-pesticides/

 

 

Vegetable seed varieties owned by Monsanto and it’s subsidiaries/brands

Here is a partial list of seed varieties that are owned by Monsanto that was recently compiled by Rosemary.  They are not GMO, however when you buy these varieties you are sending your money to Monsanto so if you intend to boycott Monsanto as much as possible it is best to avoid these.  Here are Rosemary’s notes:

“Hi all,
Recently, I’ve discovered that the “Safe Seed Pledge” taken by many garden vegetable seed companies only means those seed companies will not sell GMO seeds. It does not mean they are not selling seeds from the aggro-industry giants. Monsanto is likely the largest and best known of these companies.  At this time I will not comment further on Monsanto…

Over the last day or so, I’ve researched and created a list of all the vegetable seed varieties I could find which are owned by Monsanto and it’s subsidiaries/brands (Seminis and DeRuiter ) and which are sold in North America.  I was dismayed to see a great many names of vegetable varieties I had considered “classics” such as Big Beef, Better Boy and Patio tomatoes as well as Sweet Slice cucumber and Gold Rush zucchini.  This list does not include grains, dried peas & beans/soybeans, nor corn grown for reasons other than table corn (sweet corn). Monsanto owns over 2000 seed varieties, most of which are not presently for sale in North America so if you travel elsewhere, you will find a very different set of Monsanto owned seeds.

Please note that very, very few of the varieties on this list are GMO. Most are just the product of selective breeding (just as farmers have done for thousands of years).  I’m circulating the list so that you can make informed seed purchases.
Please feel free to circulate this list so other gardeners can also make informed choices.”

Beans, green
(Does not include dried)
BAO958
BAO999
BA1001
BA1006
EX08120703
SV1003GF
SV1137GF
Alacante
Brio
Bronco
Cadillac
Ebro
Eureka
Excalibur
Fiesta
Firstmate
Gina
Gold Dust
Gold Mine
Golden Child
Grenoble
Hercules
Labrador
Lynx
Magnum
Matador
Roman Gold
Serin
Slenderpack
Spartacus
Strike
Stringless Beauty Lake 7
Sunburst
Sybaris
Tapia
Teggia
Tema
Thoroughbred
Titan
Ulysses
Valentino

Broccoli
BC1691
Castle Dome
Coronado Crown
General
Heritage
Ironman
Legacy
Liberty
Lieutenant
Packman

Cabbage
Blue Dynasty
Constellation
Platinum Dynasty
Red Dynasty
Tropicana

Carrots
CR2289
PS07101441
SV2384DL
Bilbo
Cellobunch
Enterprise
Envy
Forto
Juliana
Karina
Propeel
Sweetness (series)
Tastypeel

Cauliflower
Cheddar (orange
cauliflower)
Cielo Blanco
Cornell
Freedom
Freemont
Juneau
Minuteman
Whistler

Corn (sweet)
EX08745857
EX08767143
QHW6RH1229
SC1102
SC1336
SV1077SD
SV1580SC
SV9010SA
SV9012SD
SV9014SB
SV9813SC
Absolute
Devotion
Fantasia
Merit
Obsession (series)
Passion (series)
Seneca Arrowhead
Sensor
Synergy
Temptation (series)
Vitality

Cucumber
CC&1040
DRL9510
SV3462CS
SV4220CS
SV4719CS
Arabian
Babylon
Camaro
Colt
Conquistador
Cool Breeze
Eldora
Emparator
Eureka
Excursion
Expedition
Fanfare
Darlington
Dasher (series)
Impact
Indy
Intimidator
Jawell
Jumbo
Marketmore (series)
Orient Express
PowerPak
Poinsett
Rockingham
Salad Bush
Sweet Slice
Sweet Sucess PS
Speedway
Talladega
Thunder
Thunderbird
Turbo
Unistars
Vlaspik
Valsset
Vlasstar

Eggplant
Fairy Tale
Gretel
Hansel
Night Shadow
Taurus

Lettuce
Annie
Braveheart
Bubba
Conquistador
Coyote
Del Oro
Desert Spring
Gator
Grizzly
Honcho
Javelina
Mohawk
Raider
Sahara
Sharpshooter
Sniper
Sure Shot
Top Billing
Valley Heart

Melons
PS04911714
SV0051WA
SV0241WA
SV0241WA
SV0258WA
WM8317
Apollo
Cabrillo
Caravelle
Charleston Grey
Colima
Cooperstown
Crimson Glory
Crimson Sweet
Cristpbal
Cronos
Delta
Destacado
Durango
Earli-dew
Earlisweet
Ever Summer
Fastbreak
Honey Dew Green Flesh
Hy-Mark
Jade Star
Laredo
Magellan
Majestic
Mickylee
Mission
Omega
Moonshine
Regency

Sweet Spot
Sweet Sunset
Valiant
Wizard

Santa Fe
Saturno
Sentinel
Starbright
StarGrazer
Tiger Baby
Wrigley
Zeus

Onions
EX07714593
SV4643NT
SV6646NW
SV6672NW
XP07716000
Aspen
Barbaro
Caballero
Candy
Century
Cougar
Elbrus
Exacta
Fortress
Goldeneye
Granex Yellow
Green Banner (green
onions)
Hamlet
Lasalle
Leona
Long Day Spanish
Short Day Granex
Montclair
Pecos
Red Zeppelin
Savannah Sweet
Sierra Blanca
Sterling
Stratus
Swale
Sweet Agent

Peas (green)
Ashton
Hacienda
Reliance

Spinach
Avenger
Barbados
Hellcat
Interceptor

Tomatoes
APT 401
PS01522935
PS01522942
PS345
PS438
SV7101TD
SV7631TD
DRC564
DRC1183
DRW
Amsterdam
Aurea
Beefmaster
Beorange
Better Boy
Big Beef
Biltmore
Bolzano
Burpee’s Big Boy
Caramba
Celebrity
Crown Jewel
Cupid
Debut
Dixie Red
Empire
Flora-Dade
Florida (series)
Foronti
Heatmaster
Health Kick
Huichol
Husky Red
Husky Cherry Red
Hybrid 46
Hybrid 882
Hypeel (series)
Komeett
Lemon Boy
Lorenzo
Maya
Merlice
Patio
Phoenix (series)
Picus
Pik Ripe 748
Pink Girl
Pio
Poseidon
Prunus
Puebla
Quincy
Sanibel
Santorange
Seri
Sunbrite
SunChief
SunGuard
Sunsugar
Sunoma
SunShine
Sunstart
Sweet Baby Girl
Tygress
Tomimaru Muchoo
Torero
Tye-Dye
Viva Italia
Yaqui
Zebrino

Squash, Summer
(including Zucchini)
XPT1832 III
SV6009YG
Ambassador
Conqueror (series)
Consul
Daisey
Depredador
Dixie
Embassy
Gemma
Gold Rush
Greyzini
Independence (series)
Judgement (series)
Justice (series)
Lolita
Papaya Pear
Patty Green Tint
Prelude (series)
President
ProGreen
Radiant
Senator
Storrs Green
Sunny Delight
Terminator

Squash, Winter
Autumn Delight
Butternight Supreme
Canesi
Early Butternut
Pasta
Taybelle PM

Squash – Pumpkin
Appalachian
Buckskin
Jamboree HG
Longface
Orange Smoothie
Phantom
Prizewinner
Snackface
Sprint
Spooktakular
Trickster
Wyatt’s Wonder

Sweet Peppers
DR0710PB
DR0713PB
PP0710
PS09941819
PS09941814
PS09942815
PS09979325
PS9915776
PS9927141
PS9928302
SV3255PB
SV3782PP
Antebellum
Antillano
Archimedes
Aristotle
Baron
Bell Boy
Big Bertha PS
Biscayne
Bounty
California Wonder
Camelot
Capistrano
Cherry Pick
Chocolate Beauty
Corno Verde
Dulce
Early Sunsation
Enterprise
Ethem
Excalibur
Fooled You
Gypsy
Huntington
Key West
King Arthur
MarRojo
Morraine
North Star
Orange Blaze
Petit Sirah
Pimiento Elite
Pimso
Plato
Prophet
Red Knight
Revelation
Sir Galahad
Socrates
Striker

Sweet Spot
Sweet Sunset
Valiant
Wizard

Hot Peppers

PS11435807
PS11435810
PS11446271
PX11404796
SV3198HJ
SV7017HJ
Aquiles
Ballpark
Big Bomb
Biggie Chile
Burning Bush
Cardon
Carribean Red
Cayenne Large Red Thick
Cherry Bomb
Chichen Itza
Chichimeca
Corcel
Coyame
Frenillo
Garden salsa
Grande
Holy Mole
Hot Spot
Hungarian Yellow Wax Hot
Inferno
Kukulkan
Major League
Mariachi
Mesilla
Mitla
Nainari
Nazas
Papaloapan
Perfecto
Rebelde
Rio de Oro
Sahuaro
Salvatierra
Santa Fe Grande
Sayula
Super Chili
Tajin
Tam Veracruz
Time Bomb
Tula
Tuxtlas
Vencedor
Victorioso